Description

Awenda offers a nice variety of looped and linear, easy to moderate trails and range from 1 to 13 km in length. One trail provides barrier-free access.

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Beach Trail – 4 km return (1.5 hours) linear, easy
This trail takes hikers along the Georgian Bay shoreline. Giant’s Tomb Island is visible from the trail. The contrast between the dry oak-maple forest of the campgrounds and the low, wet birch-cedar-hemlock forest below the bluff can be seen.

Beaver Pond Trail – 1 km (30 minutes) loop, easy, barrier free
Located in a nature reserve zone most of this trail is a boardwalk that takes you through an area altered by past and present beaver activity. Along the way you will see the remains of both a building and a bridge from the early logging days. The area also offers views of the dominant Nipissing bluff as well as excellent opportunities for viewing wildlife, wildflowers and many species of birds.

Bluff Trail – 13 km (3.5 hours) loop, moderate
This circular trail can be accessed from a number of locations within the park. It travels partly along a high bluff and partly through a low wetland. Views of Georgian Bay from sections of this trail are spectacular, especially during the late autumn, early spring leaf- free season.

Nipissing Trail – 1 km return (30 minutes) linear, moderate
The Nipissing Bluff is the dominant glacial feature in Awenda. It is a raised beach created 5,500 years ago by glacial Lake Nipissing. Today a 155 step staircase allows hikers to easily descend 32 metres down the face of the bluff, at times providing you with the sensation of being part of the forest canopy.

Brûlé Trail – 4 km return (1.5 hours) linear, easy
This trail passes through a portion of the park’s upland mixed deciduous forest. Lumbering and fires have obliterated the White Pine stands so that the majority of trees are now Sugar Maple and Red Oak. Lumbering on the peninsula was at its peak in the late 1800s. Since then the forest has been allowed to revert to its natural state but the White Pine has been unable to fully re-establish itself.

Robitaille Homestead Trail – 3 km return (1 hour) linear, easy
Hikers follow this trail to an ancient dune system. The age of these sand dunes has been estimated at 11,500 years, from the time of the last glacial retreat. The dunes are a very fragile environment and we ask that you do not climb the hillside, stand on the edge of the bluff or climb down the bluff. This will allow plants to re-establish themselves and will help us preserve this area for future park visitors. On the way to the dunes, this trail passes an abandoned farmstead originally built in 1902. Remains of the stone foundations and fence rows can still be seen.

Wendat Trail – 5 km (2 hours) loop, easy
This trail begins at Kettle’s Lake. This lake is thought to be a kettle lake formed by the gradual melting of a large buried piece of ice left by retreating glaciers. Today, this area is a favoured nesting spot for the Red-winged Blackbird and the Great Blue Heron is often seen in the swamps around the lake. The trail passes the foundations of the Brabant farmstead house and barn. Attempts to farm this area in the 1930s and 40s failed due to the poor, sandy soil.

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